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SEE

London, 2018

 

Muriël Bostdorp is a composer that favours above all instruments the piano. She finds inspiration in impressionistic music—including Debussy—as much as contemporary artists such as Lambert. See, her first solo release under the French record label Whales Records, intends to brings us to all kinds of melancholic, dreamy and imaginary spaces through a carefully selection of little stories, recorded in her own home in Amsterdam. 

 

The lullaby-like Intro sets the mood for See. The sound of the felt piano, which is a signature feature of the album, and the innocent and playful melodies of Danse des nuages or Merry-Go-Rewind extend the atmosphere in a carrousel of cascading notes and pulsating arpeggios. The cinematic About a Girl is based on an enigmatic left hand repeated phrase, while For Willem takes turn in developing musical ideas over a typical spiral rhythm. My Heart Crumbles is another beautifully written piece, contrasting between a delightful melody and swift displaced triplets. The exciting The Comforting Words of Your Mother brings memories of homemade biscuits and lazy spring afternoons. See also features some soothing pieces, such as Lights Out, that recalls the earlier lullaby sounding tracks. Miles, is a piece that seems like an homage to German composer Nils Frahm, while Beneath Starlight brings once more images of cinematic scenes and reflections. See closes on two nostalgic and somehow darker pieces—Abandoned and Falling—the latter being so evocative, that filmic images immediately started passing before my eyes.

 

Bostdorp takes inspiration in many places, including nature and its idyllic and endless possibilities. It all reflects in See, a beautiful collection of simple and enchanting piano pieces. Although I felt like Bostdorp’s music reminded me of someone else, I couldn’t quite figure out who. Then I realised, Bostdorp’s music doesn’t sound like anything else but Bostdorp…